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Berlin Innovation Panel 2016

The results of the Berlin Innovation Panel (BIP) 2016 were presented on March 8, 2017, during a press conference held by the chairman of Technologiestiftung Berlin, Nicolas Zimmer, and Berlin’s senator for economics, Romana Pop. Once again, the data underscores Berlin’s exceptional development as an innovation location.

The results of the surveys conducted in the previous years showed a slight decrease in the share of companies stating that they have introduced product or process innovations in the preceding 3-year period. This applied to Berlin, comparable metropolitan areas, and the German average. The rate in 2016 in Berlin is located at 48% and is still above the national average of 43% and also higher than in other German cities (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Share of innovators. Source: Innovation Survey Berlin 2012-2016, Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), own illustration.
Lupe [1]

 

A closer look at the trends differentiated by size-classes of the companies reveals rather diverse developments.

The Berlin and German averages of the share of innovators among small enterprises remained constant or declines (Figure 2 and 3). In addition, the increase in the rate of innovation has also come to a standstill with 50 to 249 employees in the classic medium-sized Berlin companies, and have been replaced by a decline in the larger companies.

Figure 2: Share of innovators in Berlin, differentiated by size class. Source: Innovation Survey Berlin 2012-2016, Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), own illustration.
Lupe [2]
Figure 3: Share of innovators in Germany, differentiated by size class. Source: Innovation Survey Berlin 2012-2016, Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), own illustration.
Lupe [3]

 

The proportion of innovators in Berlin industrial companies did not increase further, but has declined and is only 44% (Figure 4) in the 2016 survey. Thus a substantial difference to the share of innovators among service companies with 49% becoming apparent again this year.

Figure 4: Share of innovators in Berlin, differentiated between industrial and service companies. Source: Innovation Survey Berlin 2012-2016, Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), own illustration.
Lupe [4]

 

Figure 5 illustrates the share of innovators among companies in Berlin from the 2016 survey, differentiated by industries. Here, again shows that particularly companies in the software development (74%) and research and development (71%) and electrical industry (71%) are distinguished by a high proportion of innovators.

Figure 5: Share of innovators in Berlin (2016). Source: Innovation Survey Berlin 2016, Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), own illustration.
Lupe [5]

 

Since the use of digital technologies is becoming increasingly important in almost all sectors of the economy, the spread of digital technologies has become the focus of innovation research for the first time in 2016. The results show that digital technologies are fundamentally more widespread in the Berlin economy than in the federal average (Figure 6). At 35% of Berlin companies, digital networking is already used within production and service provision, while 23% of the dissemination rate is significantly lower in Germany. The advantage of Berlin in the application of digital technologies is also caused by the structural differences between the Berlin and the German economy. As Berlin's strong service industries, especially IT services and the creative industry, use digital technologies particularly intensively.

Figure 6: Dissemination of digitization applications. Source: Innovation Survey Berlin 2016, Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), own illustration.
Lupe [6]

 

The dissemination potential of digital technologies is still not exhausted. Data security and a lack of data protection are the most important barriers to the spread of digital technologies for all companies in Germany (Figure 7). However, the Berlin companies see it somewhat less problematic. And obviously the technical infrastructure in Berlin is generally better and thus less a problem. The difficulties of the Berlin companies are despite the numerous graduates from three universities in the shortage of IT professionals and - as with the general barriers to innovation - in financing.

Figure 7: Obstacles in the application of digital technologies. Source: Innovation Survey Berlin 2016, Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), own illustration.
Lupe [7]

 

Remark: The results of the survey waves refer to the preceding three year period, respectively. The complete report for 2016 (in German) can be found here [8].

Students who are interested in writing a bachelor´s or master´s thesis related to this topic are welcome to contact Prof. Knut Blind [9].

Contact

Prof. Dr. Knut Blind
+49 (0)30 314 76638
Room MAR 2.005
e-mail query [11]
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